Don't Let NYC Steal Our Drinking Water

Make your voice heard and stand up to protect Long Island’s drinking water!

Take Action Now

Long Island's drinking water quality and quantity are at risk, but this time it's not from an industry or a newly discovered toxic threat—now the threat is a scheme from NYC! NYC is proposing to open 68 drinking water wells in Queens that would pump up to 68 million gallons of water a day, stealing precious water from Long Island's drinking water supply.

NYC claims the water would only be used for "emergency situations," but what would Nassau County use during emergency situations? Long Island aquifers are the only source of drinking water for Nassau and Suffolk residents. Opening these wells would put our water supply at risk to contamination, lower groundwater levels, saltwater intrusion, and the draining of streams, lakes, and tributaries.

Join us for a public hearing on June 21 to make your voice heard and oppose NYC's ill-conceived plan to steal Long Island's groundwater. Don't let NYC put the drinking water of three million Long Islanders at risk!

When: Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 7:00pm
Where: Theodore Roosevelt Legislative Building, 1550 Franklin Ave, Mineola, NY
 

If you cannot attend the hearing, email the NY Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and NYC Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) today, and tell them to deny NYC's request to renew its permits that would allow it to withdraw water from LI aquifers.

Background:

Underground aquifers are Nassau and Suffolk's Counties' sole source of drinking water. New York City receives its drinking water from upstate reservoirs, which are adequately meeting the demand of all NYC residents. Up until 1996, the Jamaica Water Supply Company operated NYC wells that withdrew water from our aquifer system. While NYC has maintained the DEC permits for these wells, they have not been operational for over 20 years, and the impact of reopening these wells on groundwater resources is still being studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). NYC is proposing to reopen up to 68 wells, which can collectively pump up to 68 million gallons of water a day from Long Island's water supply, without any studies on the harmful impacts to Long Island residents and our local waterways!

If NYC is allowed to tap into Long Island's aquifers, there would be a serious risk of further contamination of Long Island's sole drinking water source from the migration of already existing toxic plumes and from saltwater intrusion. Saltwater intrusion occurs when wells draw too much water from the aquifer and salt water from our bays and harbors seeps into the aquifer. Groundwater contamination and saltwater intrusion are already polluting the drinking water resources of Long Islanders; we should not allow NYC to put our drinking water further in jeopardy.

Thank you for taking action. Together we make a difference!

Sincerely,

All of Us at CCE